V1261 Westminster Power Stak


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© 1998 - 2017 The Vox Showroom, all rights reserved. No use on online auctions, eBay or Reverb.
By 1969, Marshall amps had become the rage, and Vox was feeling a little left out. In response, Vox introduced their new Beatle and Westminster "Power Stak" amps. The US Vox V1261 Westminster Power Stak amplifier featured two 4x12 speaker enclosures coupled to a Westminster V1182 amp head. Playing off a "skyscraper" high rise theme, 1969 Vox literature introducing the Power Stak series indicated that "you have to pay extra for the ladder."

The Westminster Power Stak was nothing more than a repackaging of items previously introduced by Vox. It's introduction helped Thomas Organ to move away from the use of costly chrome tubular steel swivel trolleys for their speaker cabinets.

The 4x12 enclosure used for the Westminster "Power Stak" was introduced a year earlier as a part of the Sovereign Bass amp. Each cabinet featured four 12" Vox special design gold frame speakers with ferrite magnets manufactured by the Oxford Speaker Company of Chicago IL. The cabinets featured a bass reflex vent on the back panel that Thomas Vox called the "Bass Intensifier."

The 120 watt, 240 watt peak power V1182 Westminster head, introduced in 1968, supplied the power. See the Westminster owner's manual by clicking here. The V1182 was a two channel amp. Channel one featured rotary volume, treble and bass controls plus a Top Boost switch. The second channel featured a volume and Tone-X control.

Tone X was essentially a sweepable parametric tone control electronically similar in concept to the Wah Wah pedal. When turned fully counter clockwise, the tone from the Tone X circuit was very bassy and had little treble. When clockwise, the tone was bright and thin.

A "G-Tuner" feature provided a tuning reference tone.

While impressive in stature, the V1261 Westminster Stak had an inherent design flaw. At six feet three inches tall, the narrow, 11.5" deep cabinets did not provide a stable platform for stacking. Unfortunately, a toppling Vox Power Stak provided additional drama to the performance of many using this amp. The simple tug of a guitar cord was enough to start the action.

The 4x12 cabinets supplied by Marshall for their amp stacks were deeper and provided the stability required to keep the amp from falling over.

The suggested retail price of the V1261 Westminster Bass Stak was $995 in 1969. Adjusted for inflation, the Westminster Power Stak would retail today for about $5800.




North Coast Music manufactures many replacement and restoration

parts for the Westminster Power Stak under license from Vox. These parts are
available exclusively at North Coast Music. Some are shown below.




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Photos and editorial content courtesy Gary Hahlbeck, North Coast Music


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